a world unspoken
ode to tumblr

since some people in this world dont understand, i decided to share my thoughts about tumblr with tumblr. i mayve been mocked for saying this, but you know what, fuck people. tumblr, you understand me.

"i have to tumbl. its like a part of me. its the only place where all of my feelings are free to roam grassy fields and nobody will say a word. and reading blogs and articles on there open so many doors in my brain. usually good, sometimes bad, sometimes sad. but its so thought provoking. i love it. i need my fill of brain stimulation everyday. i need challenges for my mind to overcome and what ifs to search for answers to. especially being out of school i feel like my mind is turning into a potato since nothing is there to force me to think whether i like it or not."

the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!
the-personal-quotes:

click for relatable on your dash!

Researchers at Oxford University’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine have developed software that can detect the risk for genetic disorders in children, such as Down and Treacher Collins syndromes, just by scanning old photographs of their family members.

More than 7,000 rare genetic disorders are known, and although each is unique, there is at least one common thread: 30 to 40 percent of them involve detectable abnormalities in the cranium and face. The Oxford project, called Clinical Face Phenotype Space, builds on this knowledge, melding machine learning and computer technology to scan family photos and cross-reference them with a database built from images of people with known genetic disorders.

The Clinical Face Phenotype Space recognizes faces in photographs regardless of a person’s pose or facial expression, image quality, lighting variations or other factors.